Mailbag! Listener Questions and Comments That Got Us Thinking



Shereen and Gene tackle listeners’ reactions to recent episodes. One wants to know the difference between Persian and Iranian. (It’s complicated.) Another wants more details about the risks to churches for becoming sanctuaries. (We asked a lawyer.) And a professor gave us a “loving critique” of our episode on Native hunting rights and sovereignty. (Thank you.) Plus a special call-out to the racial imposter in you.



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John Leguizamo, Still In Search Of John Leguizamo



This week, Gene welcomes NPR’s Audie Cornish to talk about multi-talented writer, producer and comedian John Leguizamo. As a performer, he’s mined his Latino identity through his own family and old New York neighborhoods for decades. Audie interviewed Leguizamo in New York during the current run of his latest one-man show, Latin History For Morons. Now a father, Leguizamo struggles with what he knows and what he can teach his son and daughter about being Latino in the U.S., while challenging himself to be the dad he’d always wanted his own father to be.



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Master of None's Alan Yang Unpacks Season 2



Gene and guest co-host Lenika Cruz, who covers culture at The Atlantic, welcome Alan Yang. He and comedian Aziz Ansari created an Emmy-winning comedy series that stepped comfortably out of the usual TV comfort zones. Master of None just premiered an already beloved second season, and Yang talks about making bold creative choices, crafting inclusive stories, and writing complex characters with an Asian American lead at the center of it all.



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Japanese Americans Exiled In Utah



The story of over 100,000 Japanese Americans enduring life in internment camps during WW II is well known, but a few thousand avoided the camps, entirely by, essentially, self-exiling. Code Switch correspondent Karen Grigsby Bates talks with research historian Diana Tsuchida, about the hidden history of Japanese Americans who survived by creating farming communities, like the one in Keetley, Utah. We also hear directly from survivors about life as internally displaced American citizens.



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We're Still Talking About "My Family's Slave"



This week, we join the global conversation on The Atlantic‘s essay “My Family’s Slave,” in which Alex Tizon writes about Eudocia Tomas Pulido, who was his family’s katulong, or domestic servant, for 56 years. Why did Eudocia’s story hit such a raw nerve in the U.S. and the Philippines? Shereen and Gene talk to Vicente Rafael, a professor who has studied and written about the practice in his native Philippines. We also hear from Lydia Catina Amaya, a Filipina who was a katulong in the Philippines and the United States. And we talk to Melissa Tizon, the author’s widow. Eudocia Tomas Pulido lived in their home for the last 12 years of her life.



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'Give It Up For DJ Blackface!'



This week, we follow the strange trend of white dance-music DJs who pass themselves off as black artists. Gene talks to legendary House music DJ Ron Trent. The European producer Guy Tavares chimes in from The Netherlands on what he sees as overhyped controversy. Piotr Orlov, who covers dance music for NPR weighs in on what this all means for music fans.



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